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About FWP Employment

Opportunities

 

Wondering what the qualifications are for a Fish, Wildlife & Parks warden? Interested in becoming a fisheries biologist? Hoping to volunteer as a campground host? See below for more information.

Current FWP Openings

To see current FWP job opportunities on the State of Montana Career Site:

  1. Go to State of Montana Careers

  2. Click "View our career opportunities"

  3. Search by organization — "Fish, Wildlife & Parks"

Employment Information

Application and Selection Process

The process used to evaluate an applicant's qualifications may include an evaluation of the State of Montana Employment Application and supplemental responses if required, a performance test or work sample, a structured interview, and reference or background checks. Applicants will be notified when screening has been completed.

 

Benefits

State employees working at least half time are also provided paid health, dental, vision, and life insurance. Other benefits for eligible state employees include a credit union, a deferred compensation program, public employees' retirement program, 15 working days annual leave per year, 12 days sick leave per year, paid holidays, and up to 15 days military leave with full pay. Earned leave benefits may be used for maternity and parental (birth or adoption) leave and for immediate family illness care.

 

Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Plan

The department’s Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Plan reaffirms the department’s commitment to fair and equitable treatment of applicants and employees without regard to race, color, national origin, age, physical or mental disability, marital status, religion, creed, sex, pregnancy, childbirth or a medical condition related to pregnancy or childbirth, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, political beliefs, genetic information, military service or veteran's status, culture, social origin or condition, or ancestry unless based on a bona fide occupational qualification (BFOQ).

 

Reasonable Accommodation

Under state and federal law qualified applicants with disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations. Modifications or adjustments may be provided to assist applicants to compete in the recruitment and selection process, to perform the essential duties of the job or to enjoy equal benefits and privileges of employment available to other employees. An applicant must request an accommodation when needed. If you need any such accommodation, contact Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks using the information provided above. TTY users may call the TTY number if available or use the relay service by dialing 711. The State of Montana makes reasonable accommodation for any known disability that may interfere with an applicant's ability to compete in the recruitment and selection process or an employee's ability to perform the essential duties of the job. For the department to consider any such accommodation, the applicant must make known any needed accommodation.

 

Employee Preference

The Veteran's Public Employment Preference Act and the Persons with Disabilities Public Employment Preference Act provide preference in public employment for certain military veterans and people with disabilities or their eligible relatives. An applicant claiming employment preference must complete an Employment Preference Form, PD-25A, available through your local Montana Job Service Workforce Center or see the State of Montana Employment Information website. You must also provide the appropriate documentation of eligibility with the application. The required documentation may include a DD-214; a document issued by the Office of the Adjutant General of the Montana National Guard certifying service; or a PHHS Certifications of Disability form. Contact your local Montana Vocational Rehabilitation Services Office, Department of Public Health and Human Services for details on obtaining persons with disabilities preference certification. For more information, contact your local Job Service Workforce Center.

 

Immigration Reform and Control Act

In accordance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act, the person selected must produce within three days of hire, documentation that he or she is authorized to work in the United States. Examples of such documentation include a birth certificate or social security card along with a driver's license or other picture I.D., a United States Passport, Certificate of Naturalization, a Permanent Resident Card, an Alien Registration Receipt Card (Green Card), or a Resident Alien Card.

 

Montana Compliance with Military Selective Service Act

In accordance with the Montana Compliance with Military Selective Service Act, men selected for state government employment must produce documentation showing compliance with the federal Military Selective Service Act. Examples of this documentation include a registration card issued by Selective Service, a letter from Selective Service showing a man was not required to register, or information showing by a preponderance of evidence that a man's failure to register with Selective Service was not done knowingly or willfully.

Basic Job Qualifications

These are the basic job qualifications and descriptions for specific positions within Fish, Wildlife & Parks.

 

Game Warden

Position Overview

The Law Enforcement Division has a specific role in meeting the mandate of the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to protect, perpetuate, enhance and regulate the wise use of the state’s natural and cultural resources for the benefit of the people of Montana. The division enforces laws of Montana and rules of the department with regard to protection and preservation of game and non-game wildlife, state park resources, laws and rules associated with recreational use and protection of state lands, and laws and rules associated with the licensing and operation of boats, snowmobiles and off-highway vehicles. Additionally, the division performs various administrative functions in safety and education programs related to the department’s missions. The Enforcement Division maintains a strong commitment to protecting and managing wildlife and its environment while at the same time, retaining its commitment to Montana’s hunting, fishing, trapping and outdoor recreation heritage. This is accomplished by providing education and consistent statewide enforcement of statues, department regulations, and federal land management agencies laws in each of the seven regions of the state.

Montana Game Wardens are Peace Officers who conduct investigations of all felony and misdemeanor criminal violations of laws, rules and regulations under FWP jurisdiction. Through both proactive and reactive public contacts, wardens engage in law enforcement efforts to protect Montana’s public fish, wildlife and parks resources. These efforts include citing/arresting violators, executing search warrants, compiling evidence, writing reports and testifying in court. Wardens work with and assist other wardens, covert and overt FWP investigators, United States Fish and Wildlife Service and other law enforcement personnel in the course of criminal wildlife and resource related investigations.

Wardens are required to reside within the boundaries of their assigned warden district. Limited and rare exceptions to this requirement may be considered on a case by case basis and must be authorized by the Chief of Enforcement.

 

Physical and Environmental Demands

By the nature and complexity of warden’s duties, typically the warden is available 24 hours a day / 7 days a week to support field staff, respond to the public and address wildlife issues. Job demands are heaviest during weekends & holidays. Wardens work odd hours, generally alone with no backup. Officer must regularly respond to verbal communication, alarms, telephones and radio communications.

Wardens must be in excellent physical health and condition. This position requires frequent climbing, bending, pushing, pulling, dragging. Requires lifting 50lbs unassisted. Working with sick or injured wildlife, removing illegal kills, trapping and relocating animals, back packing, horseback patrols, loading and unloading, operating boats, snowmobiles, and OHV’s, physical labor in deep snow, and use of force incidents that require physical strength, stamina and/or force. Wardens must be in excellent mental condition as they must deal with all types of personalities and stress levels.

The warden is required to function in all weather extremes, under adverse working conditions for prolonged patrols and activities.  Patrolling often requires sitting for long periods of time in a vehicle. Handling various wildlife and equipment, traversing rough terrain, including water, operating vehicles/vessels at high speeds and under unstable conditions may result in injury. Dangerous interactions with criminals, executing arrests and being subject to assault and to dangerous substances including drugs and bodily fluids is to be expected.

 

Minimum Qualifications
  • At least 18 years of age on the date of appointment.

  • A United States citizen and must be or become a Montana resident in conjunction with appointment as a Fish, Wildlife & Parks Warden.

  • The applicant must possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university. Preferred degrees in Fish and Wildlife, Park Management, Outdoor Recreation, Criminal Justice or a closely related field.

  • In excellent physical and mental health and must be able to pass a medical examination and a strength and agility test according to standards set forth by the Montana Board of Crime Control and prescribed by the department (minimum visual acuity is 20/100 corrected to 20/20 in both eyes).

  • Must possess a valid driver's license. 

  • Have a basic knowledge of major fish and wildlife species and outdoor recreation in Montana.

 

Park Ranger Generalist

Position Overview

Parks Division management and staff are responsible for the functions necessary to preserve, enhance, and interpret a diverse representation of Montana's most outstanding natural, cultural/historic, and recreational resources, for the personal, social, and economic benefit of present and future generations, and to help facilitate sustainable economic development through tourism. 

Additionally, the Division manages outdoor recreation grant programs including grants to local trails programs, grants to snow mobile clubs and a community recreation grants program.  The Division and Regional park units maintain volunteer programs, direct park support groups, hold special events, monitor commercial uses, enlist community members with park planning, and engage local communities through natural and historical education for the resources we manage.

The Ranger Generalist  job purpose is to assist park managers in all daily operations of a unit or units of the state park system and the state trails programs.  This work will primarily encompass broad administrative, operational, maintenance, and public relations activities.    This position provides essential services and tasks as they arise, such as visitor contacts, building and grounds maintenance and cleaning, park rule compliance, fee collection and remittance, interpretation and education, and other duties as assigned.

The Ranger Generalist  position will work under the immediate supervision of the Park Manager, and will provide direction for other park staff and volunteers.  In the absence of the Park Manager the incumbent may be assigned acting Park Manager responsibilities. 

 

Physical and Environmental Demands
  • Ability to move 50 lbs over distance of 25 feet.

  • Ability to sit or stand for long periods of time.

  • Ability to work in environmental extremes for long periods of time.

  • Ability to assist public independently, in extremely harsh terrain, and at night.

  • Occasional travel.

  • Working odd hours, weekends and holidays is required.

 

Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through a combination of education and experience equivalent to a bachelor’s degree in park and or recreation management, archeology, geology or related fields and minimum of 1-year job-related experience.  Other combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Must be able to acquire and maintain CPR, first aid. Complete training in the delivery of interpretive services either through the National Association of Interpretation Certified Interpretive Guide program or Epply Institute Fundamentals of Interpretation or alternate equivalent approved training program within 24 months of hire.

 

Park Manager

Position Overview

The Park Managers job purpose is to manage and coordinate all daily operations of a unit or units of the State Park System and state trails programs.  This work will primarily encompass broad administrative, operational, maintenance, and public relations activities.  This position will manage daily park or program operations, employees, visitor behavior, facilities, and grounds within the assigned State Park or Trail program.  Park Managers may also be tasked with conducting park rule compliance duties within the scope of their training. This position provides essential services and tasks as they arise, such as building and grounds maintenance and cleaning, park rule compliance, protecting public safety, fee collection and remittance, interpretation and education, special recreation permit and commercial use compliance and other various responsibilities.  The Park Manager position will work under the immediate supervision of the Park Program Manager (Regional Park Manager), and will provide direction for other park staff and volunteers.  In the absence of the Parks Program Manager the incumbent may be assigned acting Park Program Manager responsibilities.

 

Physical and Environmental Demands
  • Ability to lift 50 lbs.

  • Ability to sit or stand for long periods of time.

  • Ability to work in environmental extremes for long periods of time.

  • Ability to fulfill and maintain requirements for ex-officio warden status.

  • Ability to assist public in extremely harsh terrain.

  • Willingness to travel on occasion.

  • Willingness to work odd hours, weekends and holidays.

  • Work effectively in all extreme environmental conditions.

  • Work in various locations, conditions and hours.

 

Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through a Bachelor’s Degree in Park Management, Resource Conservation, Outdoor Recreation, or a related field and at least 2 years of job-related experience.  Other combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case  basis.

 

Fisheries Technicians

Position Overview

The Fisheries Division develops programs and budgets to meet this mandate for aquatic resources.  State programs are managed and coordinated at the regional level by the fisheries manager.  Implementation of programs for individual waters are accomplished by the respective fisheries biologists.  Fisheries technicians assist the fisheries biologist and manager in carrying out specified fisheries management and research activities.  Management decisions will often have local, statewide and national effects on resource status and conservation.

The goals and projects developed by the biologist and fish managers in each region are based on the overall goals and mission of the Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks and the Fisheries Division.  Generally, the duties of the Fisheries Tech may include survey and inventory of aquatic species and their habitats using traditional sampling gear (nets, electrofishing, weirs, etc.) and complex electronic equipment to assess abundance, recruitment, reproductive performance, age, growth, survival/mortality, movements and behavior, as well as angler use and preferences. This position records, enters and manages data and operates and maintains fisheries equipment. Duties may include planning and coordination with the biologist for survey and inventory of aquatic species, planning and utilization  of electronic testing and tracking equipment on fisheries resources for monitoring survival/mortality, movements and behavior, and reproductive performance, planning and coordination of creel surveys, and the collection of biological and habitat samples.  This position may supervise other fisheries technicians depending on the needs and goals of projects for the region.

 

Physical and Environmental Demands

Work will involve field research activities that occasionally require a change and re-organization of work schedules and overnight travel.  Working conditions are routinely hazardous.  Technician will work in/around water on lakes, river, and streams that may be dangerous and work with/be exposed to potentially lethal capture equipment and drugs. Exposure to chemical agents and offensive sights and sounds.  Extreme caution and rigorous protocol must be followed to prevent exposure to serious health hazards indoors and outdoors.  Occasional exposure to outdoor hazards such as severe weather, water hazards, and extreme terrain is expected.  Requires lifting heavy objects and carrying 75 lbs. on uneven terrain or in water, which may expose the employee to slick walking surfaces.  In addition, work in and around watercraft is expected.  Interactions with public may include landowners or anglers and hunters who have conflicting issues and concerns. The frequency of contacts varies depending on the activity under consideration, but some type of public contact is typically engaged in on a daily basis.

Typical situations encountered by this technician will involve field challenges relative to applications of standard techniques and adaptations to those techniques in a field setting.  Adaptations to procedures in field operations may become necessary because of human safety issues, aquatic resource considerations, landownership issues, or environmental conditions.  Integrating all of these factors into daily field operation decisions yet accomplishing study objectives will demand creativity within the bounds of the data collection standards and cooperation among field staff.

Field research activities will require good interpersonal skills that facilitate cooperation and support among the various affected interests working and living in the study area.  Interpersonal relations will include communicating and cooperating with coworkers, landowners and various publics to maintain support for the project. Coordinating various agency personnel supporting the field operations is often complicated and requires good problem solving and interpersonal skills.  

 

Fisheries Technician Level 3 Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent. Experience or training in resource management, biology, laboratory, or work closely related to the specific duties of this position is preferred.  Other combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

Fisheries Technician Level 4 Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to a Bachelor’s Degree in fish biology, fish and wildlife management, ecology, biology, and one year of job-related experience.  Other combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

Fisheries Technician Level 5 Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree in fish biology, fish and wildlife management, ecology, biology, and three years of progressive job-related experience or work closely related to fish and wildlife biology.  Other combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case  basis.

 

Fisheries Management Biologist

Position Overview

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) provides for the stewardship of fish, wildlife, parks and recreational resources of Montana while contributing to the quality of life for present and future generations.  The Fisheries Division develops programs to meet this mandate for aquatic resources. A District Management Biologist’s work focuses on managing fisheries resources in a defined management area.  District Management Biologists report to Regional Fisheries Managers who manage specific regional areas in the state.  They provide a foundation for the management, protection, and enhancement of both native and non-native species to provide diverse recreational opportunities for the public.  Fisheries technicians assist the District Management Biologist and Regional Fisheries Manager in carrying out technical guidance and survey and inventory work that is outlined in Federal Aid for Sport Fish Restoration Act work plans for the benefit of the resource and the public.  These positions ensure the program is able to protect fisheries resources in Montana for current and future generations.

Fisheries District Management Biologists carry out work that is outlined in AFA work plans.  These work plans are developed between the program and USFWS (US Fish & Wildlife Service) 

District Management Biologists:

  • Provide technical guidance to conservation districts, private land owners, state and federal agencies, NGO’s on permitting processes, etc.

  • Plans and coordinates survey and inventory  activies to evaluate fisheries populations, habitat and human dimension factors to:

    • Protect and enhance fish species, populations, and communities to fulfill FWP’s statutory responsibilities and for the benefit and enjoyment of the public.

    • Protect and enhance aquatic habitats occupied or required by native and non-native species, including elements of physical habitat features, water quality and quantity, and riparian habitat.

    • Provide public opportunities for learning about the responsible use and management of native and non-native fisheries and their habitats.

    • Create/modify fishing regulations for waterbodies

These activities are intended to:

  • Protect and enhance native and/or non-native fish species/populations/communities for the benefit and enjoyment of the public

  • Protect and enhance aquatic habitat including elements of physical habitat features and water quality and water quantity, aquatic habitat

  • Provide public fishing access

  • Provide public opportunities for learning about the responsible use and management of fisheries, waters and other aquatic resources.

 

Physical and Environmental Demands

This is a physically demanding position often  involving backpack,  mobile-probe electrofishing, or boom shocking with large and small watercraft, setting and pulling gill nets, trap nets, hoop nets, or seines accessing with boat or by personally hauling gear into slick, muddy or uneven terrain.  Sampling can be strenuous when accessing reservoirs, lakes, ponds, streams and rivers while working from various jet, propeller and manually powered watercraft, and accessing areas by truck, ATV, snowmobile, motorcycle, or hiking to sample those flowing and flat waters found in each district. The incumbent must have the ability and willingness to work in and around water in adverse and hazardous conditions, including inclement hot and cold weather.  The work schedule is variable, often requiring work outside of normal business days and hours and may involve overnight stays in remote field locations for a week or longer.

 

Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills and abilities required to perform the duties of this position are usually acquired through a Master's Degree in Fish and Wildlife Biology, Range Management, Zoology, or Fish and Wildlife Management, Biology or a closely related biological field including completion of a field research project presented in a successfully defended thesis.

Equivalent experience is defined as five (5) years of progressively responsible experience as a fisheries/wildlife biologist or senior fisheries/wildlife technician, in addition to successful completion of a research effort that includes:

  1. Literature review and development of a problem statement and or hypothesis for a particular issue.

  2. Development of a detailed study plan or sampling protocol for a field-oriented project based on the above-noted hypothesis.

  3. Data collection and the effective management of data with an appropriate application.

  4. Interpretation and analysis of data, including a quantitative assessment of that information.

  5. Completion of a final report in a peer-reviewed publication or a publication comparable to a refereed journal.

  6. If appropriate to the project, formulation of any recommended changes in management prescriptions or actions.

  7. Oral presentation on results of investigation to agency staff and public audiences.

  8. If you feel you meet the equivalent experience, please provide a supplemental response in your application that indicates your experience level relative to each point.

This is a physically demanding position with a varied work schedule which may involve backpack electrofishing, boat electrofishing, seining, setting and pulling trap, gill, and/or hoop nets,  redd count surveys in large and small, steep-gradient and lower-gradient streams or larger order rivers by boat or aircraft; hiking, driving, boating, or flying into, and  sampling  reservoirs, lakes, ponds, streams, and rivers.  Piloting and working from various jet, propeller and manually powered watercraft on flowing and flat waters. The incumbent must have the ability and willingness to work in and around water in adverse and hazardous conditions, including inclement weather.  The work schedule is variable, often requiring work outside of normal business days and hours, and may involve overnight stays in remote field locations for a week or longer.

Incumbent will develop good working rapport with conservation districts and will review permit applications.  Proposed projects and their individual and potential cumulative impacts will be closely scrutinized and will often be contentious.

Incumbent will work often and effectively with various organized sportsman’s groups and a variety of other public, private and political entities, in situations that will often be contentious and with high importance to stakeholders. Works frequently and closely with non-FWP entities.

 

Wildlife Management Biologist

Position Overview

The department is mandated to protect, perpetuate, enhance and regulate the sustainable use of Montana's renewable wildlife resources for public benefit now and in the future.  The Wildlife Division is responsible for developing programs that are responsive to that mandate.  Programs are designed in coordination with Helena staff and implemented at the field level by the Wildlife biologist with technical assistance, professional advice and supervision of the Regional Wildlife Manager.  The Wildlife biologist addresses complex social and biological issues at a regional level but may be directed to participate in matters with statewide or national implications.

The Wildlife biologist is responsible for the implementation of the Department's wildlife management program, including the State Wildlife Action Plan, in an assigned area of one of 7 regions. This includes designing and conducting field investigations on wildlife populations and habitats, preparing wildlife management recommendations, communicating department programs and policies, informing the general public of wildlife and habitat matters, maintaining, enhancing, and protecting wildlife habitat and hunting access on private and public lands and maintaining proficiency as a professional wildlife scientist. 

 

Physical and Environmental Demands

Survey, capture, and handling methods frequently involve stressful and dangerous situations.  Surveys require travel in low-level fixed wing and helicopter flights in mountain valley, foothill and high mountain habitats.  Capturing and handling wildlife involves the use of potentially lethal immobilization chemicals.  Injuries may occur when handling big game animals such as deer, elk, bears, lions, moose, and sheep.

Wildlife surveys and inventories often require use of light aircraft and helicopter at low altitudes and in hazardous flying conditions, sitting in confined spaces with exposure to high noise levels.

Field work is often carried out alone in rugged terraine during unpredictable and inclement weather conditions.  Hours of work are often long and irregular, and include evening meetings and occasional weekend work.  

 

Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to a Master's Degree in Fish and Wildlife Management, Wildlife Biology, Range Management, Zoology or Biology, including completion of a field research project presented in a successfully defended thesis.   Other combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case  basis.

Equivalent experience is defined as five (5) years of progressively responsible experience as a wildlife biologist or senior wildlife technician that includes examples of:

  1. Literature review and development of a problem statement and or hypothesis for a particular issue.

  2. Development of a detailed study plan or sampling protocol for a field-oriented project based on the above-noted hypothesis.

  3. Data collection and the effective management of data with an appropriate application.

  4. Interpretation and analysis of data, including a quantitative assessment of that information.

  5. Completion of a final report in a peer-reviewed publication or a publication comparable to a refereed journal.

  6. If appropriate to the project, formulation of any recommended changes in management prescriptions and or actions.

  7. Oral presentation on results of investigation to agency staff or public audience.

Other combinations of education and experience which could provide such knowledge, skills and abilities will be evaluated on an individual basis.

 

Wildlife Technicians

Position Overview

The Wildlife Division is responsible for the conservation and management of Montana’s 600+ species of wild animals and their habitat.  The Wildlife Division manages animals legislatively categorized as big game, nongame, migratory game birds, upland game, furbearers, and threatened and endangered species. Responsibilities within the Wildlife Division fall into four major themes:  Wildlife Management, Habitat, Access, and Wildlife Conflict Prevention.  Program staff in Helena develops program priorities in conjunction with Regional staff in 7 Administrative Regions, who then implement the program at the field level. 

The Wildlife Technician will be assigned to support and conduct projects addressing statewide wildlife management priorities. This work may include the use of GPS and radio-transmitters on wildlife for monitoring survival/mortality, movements and behavior, and reproductive performance, survey flights, ground surveys, the collection of biological samples. 

The technician will be responsible for collecting the data from wildlife as directed.  They may conduct surveys and sex/age classifications of animal species, trap or capture animals to collar and/or monitor collared animals. The technician may collect biological samples  from animals, including blood, tissue, or skeletal parts, and may investigate death sites of animals to determine cause of death.  The technician may also provide assistance at hunter check stations in collecting hunter, harvest, and biological data from harvested animals.  The technician may work with the public, landowners, hunters, University personnel, Federal land managers, other FWP staff and the media to coordinate projects.  The technician may analyze the data collected to interpret information for reports used in making program decisions.

 

Physical and Environmental Demands

Work will involve field activities that occasionally require a change and re-organization of work schedules, occasional travel, and lifting heavy objects.  Working conditions are routinely hazardous.  Incumbent will work with/around wildlife that may be dangerous, and work with/be exposed to potentially lethal capture drugs. Exposure to potentially harmful pathogens, chemical agents and offensive sights and sounds are routine.  Extreme caution and rigorous protocol must be followed to prevent exposure to serious health hazards indoors and outdoors.  Occasional exposure to outdoor hazards such as severe weather and extreme terrain is expected.  In addition, work in and around aircraft is expected. 

Typical problems encountered by this technician will involve field challenges relative to applications of standard techniques and procedures and the adaptations to those techniques and procedures in a field setting.  Specifically, the technician may need to decide when, where and what modifications or adaptations would be necessary and appropriate to complete a specific task.  Adaptations to procedures and modifications of field operations become necessary because of human safety issues, animal welfare considerations, landownership issues, or environmental conditions.  Integrating all of these factors into daily field operation decisions yet accomplishing study objectives will demand creativity within the bounds of the data collection standards and cooperation among field staff.

Field activities will require good interpersonal skills that facilitate cooperation and support among the various affected interests working and living in the study area.  Interpersonal relations will include communicating and cooperating with coworkers, landowners and various publics to maintain support for the research project. Coordinating various agency personnel supporting the field operations is often complicated and requires good problem solving and interpersonal skills.

 

Wildlife Technician Level 3 Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to  at least one year of college in pursuit of a bachelor’s degree in wildlife biology, fish and wildlife management, animal ecology, biology, or a closely related field and some related work experience.   Combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case  basis.

 

Wildlife Technician Level 4 Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to a minimum of two years of college work towards a bachelor’s degree in wildlife biology, fish and wildlife management, animal ecology, biology, or a closely related field and related work experience.  Combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

 

Wildlife Technician Level 5 Minimum Qualifications

The knowledge, skills, and abilities of this position are normally attained through combination of education and experience equivalent to a bachelor’s degree in wildlife biology, fish and wildlife management, animal ecology, biology, or a closely related field and some related work experience.   Combinations of education and experience will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Internal FWP Positions

Internal recruitments are conducted for certain vacancies within Fish, Wildlife & Parks with approval from the Director. The positions are posted internally to give our current staff an opportunity to advance in their career here at FWP. Therefore, positions are open to current staff only when it appears there would be enough qualified candidates from within our organization to select from to find the individual with the best fit for a given position.

All internal recruitments shall comply with the Collective Bargaining Agreements as well as the Montana Operations Manual (MOM) Vacancy Announcements.

 

Eligibility

Internal recruitments are open to all current regular, seasonal and seasonal less than six month employees including employees who may be in an Inactive Status.

Short-term workers and Temporary workers do not qualify to be considered for an internal vacancy requisition. Short-term workers and temporary workers are invited to apply for any FWP External recruitments posted on the State of Montana Career Website.

Notice: To be considered for an internal recruitment, the employee must be in good standing in their current position.

 

Application Process

To apply for an internal recruitment, interested employees must submit an updated resume and other required documents to the Human Resource contact person listed on the vacancy announcement no later than midnight on the closing date — see vacancy announcement for required documents and the closing date. Not providing all the required documents by the closing date will eliminate an employee from consideration for the position.

 

Current Vacant Positions

Please click on the PDF to view vacant positions:

Volunteer Positions

Parks

Each year, park volunteers serve as campground hosts, visitor center attendants, naturalists, and assistants on special projects. They volunteer so that current and future generations may enjoy these special places as much as they have.  Learn more

 

Big Game Check Stations

Check station volunteers measure elk and deer antlers, pull incisor teeth for aging, and collect information from hunters regarding where and how they hunted and their success. It is a good opportunity to get your hands dirty and to interact with the public. Those with experience, and/or desire, will have the opportunity to undertake the messier tasks (e.g., pulling teeth). Those who would rather observe such tasks will be asked to record and tally information. For more information, contact the region where you would like to volunteer.

 

Hunter/Bowhunter Education Instructors

The heart of Montana’s hunter and bowhunter education programs is the corps of dedicated volunteer instructors. They stand as examples of how each hunter should demonstrate ethics, behavior and responsibility to themselves, landowners, other hunters and the resource.

These instructors choose to honor Montana’s hunting heritage and “Pass it On” by sharing their skills, experiences and their love of hunting and Montana’s vast resources with those new to hunting and the outdoor adventure.

To apply to be an instructor, visit here. 

Internships

An internship is a short-term work experience in which a college student applies what they have learned in college to the world of work. This learning experience usually involves applying for a position that relates to their major/minor. The student usually receives academic credit and a grade through their curriculum department.

 

Eligibility

The Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks Internship Program is open to any student currently enrolled in an accredited university/college. This includes all public, private, community, vo-tech and Native American institutions of higher learning.

 

Pay

Many college students, especially biology and park/recreation majors, are required to complete an internship prior to graduation. Fish, Wildlife & Parks has opportunities available in these and many other fields, but the positions vary each year. Most are paid positions, but some are volunteer only. A few locations offer housing, but most interns must secure their own housing and transportation to work site.

 

Dates

Internships can be done all year around, however, the majority take place during the months of May-September. The length varies depending on the project that needs to be completed and the timeframe required to get it done. Positions are located statewide.

 

Contact

For more information regarding internship opportunities with Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks, contact Intern Coordinator Debbie Cheek at (406) 439-8299 or email dcheeck@mt.gov 

 

Intern Announcements

  • Students must be currently enrolled in a university/college

  • Interns are hired through the college where they are currently enrolled

  • Student interns must have a valid driver’s license to drive a state vehicle. They also must have current vehicle insurance if they drive their personal vehicle during their internship.

 

Current Internship Opportunities
 

  • Parks Visitation Field Intern (PDF)
    Location: Needs to be able to report to one of the following FWP offices: Kalispell, Missoula, Bozeman, Great Falls, Miles City, or Helena

AmeriCorps

Montana State Parks AmeriCorps

Share your talents, learn new skills, and earn money for education—all while working amid Montana’s natural and cultural treasures. Montana State Parks AmeriCorps promotes healthy, active, and environmentally aware communities by enhancing park land, enriching educational opportunities, building volunteer capacity, and strengthening community outreach.

Members come from across the state and the country to serve 18, 23, or 44 week terms at one of our incredible state parks. A high school diploma or equivalent is required, and members usually have at least some college experience and range in age from young adults to retirees.

All members receive a living stipend as well as an AmeriCorps Education Award upon successful completion of the program.

Learn more