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Welcome to FWP Region 3

FWP's administrative Region 3 is located in southwest Montana and includes the counties of Beaverhead, Broadwater, Gallatin, Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, Madison, Park, Silver Bow, and part of Deer Lodge. Region 3 encompasses 18,089 square miles, which is more than 12% of the total land area of Montana. About 60% of the region is made up of public lands administered by the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

Southwest Montana is made up of broad valleys comprised of prairie habitats of grasslands, sagebrush, and wooded riparian areas rising to foothills and mountains as high as 11,000 feet in elevation. Most of the lower lands are privately-owned, while most of the higher reaches are federally-owned by the U.S. Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management.

Region 3 is home to 9 state parks, including Montana's oldest—Lewis and Clark Caverns—and Bannack State Park, the site of the first Territorial Capital. The region is headwaters to some of the most renowned trout rivers in the U.S., including the Madison, Gallatin, Jefferson, upper Missouri, upper Yellowstone, Beaverhead, and Big Hole. About 26% of Montana's angling takes place in Region 3, and the region boasts 95 fishing access sites. Big game hunting is a major draw in southwest Montana. Approximately 50% of the elk harvest in the entire state happens in Region 3.

Recent Region 3 News

FWP Updates Snow Goose Consumption Advisory

Tue Feb 21 15:43:29 MST 2017

While it would appear safe for humans to consume muscle tissue and organs of these harvested geese, under the circumstances, it is at the discretion of the hunter whether he or she chooses to eat or discard snow geese harvested after the Nov. 28 event.

(Region 3 - Hunting)

Shed Hunters Urged to Hold Off Until Spring

Fri Feb 10 13:38:52 MST 2017

Winter can be a tough time for us humans, whether struggling with a pesky cold or digging out from the latest snowstorm. Now imagine what it’s like for Montana’s elk population. It’s an especially stressful time for elk, with deep snow and limited food options. That’s why Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is asking shed hunters and other recreationists to give elk their space until the snow melts and the animals are less stressed.

(Region 3 - Recreation News)

2016-2017 Winter Count of Northern Yellowstone Elk

Mon Jan 23 10:41:13 MST 2017

The Northern Yellowstone Cooperative Wildlife Working Group conducted its annual winter survey of the northern Yellowstone elk population on January 15, 2017. The survey, using three airplanes, was conducted by staff from the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks and the National Park Service.

(Region 3 - Fish & Wildlife)