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Upper Spotted Dog Creek Restoration Project--Draft EA

05/15/2020

FWP Region 2 proposes to conduct restoration work on approximately 6,000 feet (1.1 miles) of Spotted Dog Creek within FWP’s Spotted Dog Wildlife Management Area (WMA) northeast of Deer Lodge in Powell County. Proposed actions would create, enhance, and protect wetland, riparian, and aquatic habitat within the WMA. Proposed Phase 1 work in 2020 would include slope wetland restoration, instream beaver habitat structure construction, and weed control. Proposed Phase 2 work in 2021 would include channel construction; existing channel enhancement; streambank construction and stabilization; floodplain grading and increasing surface roughness; wetland creation and enhancement; riparian perimeter fencing; and floodplain, wetland, and streambank revegetation. The proposed action would be undertaken by the Montana Department of Justice, Natural Resource Damage Program (NRDP) on behalf of FWP.

(Region 2 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Draft Environmental Assessment Phillips 66 Carrier LLC Easement Admendment, Giant Springs State Park

05/12/2020

An amendment to the existing easement (Reel 46 Doc No 3831 of the official Public Records of Cascade County, Montana) over land owned by Montana Fish, Wildlife, & Parks (FWP) has been requested by Phillips 66 Pipeline LLC on behalf of Phillips 66Carrier LLC to add a new section of 12-inch diameter crude oil pipeline to the existing right-of-way agreement and abandon part of the existing pipeline once the new pipeline is tied in and operational.

(Region 4 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Pine Grove Pond Fishing Access Site Picnic Pavilion Draft Environmental Assessment

02/13/2020

Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (FWP) is proposing to construct a second covered picnic pavilion at the west end of the Pine Grove Pond Fishing Access Site (FAS) near Kalispell in FWP Region One. The footprint of the new pavilion would be approximately 22ft by 16ft or 352 sq. ft. The pavilion would be built on a concrete slab connected to an existing path to make it accessible to all users. Picnic tables would be placed under the roof for seating. Construction would be very similar to that of the existing pavilion at the east end of the pond. The public comment period will extend for (30) thirty days. Written comments will be accepted until 5:00 P.M. March 15, 2020.

(Region 1 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Fireman's Point riverbank repair; draft EA

02/13/2020

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) proposes to repair 100 feet of riverbank along the Stillwater River at Fireman’s Point fishing access site (FAS). The proposed improvement includes excavating the existing bank back and install a Class 3-4 rip rap toe. Rip rap would be placed slightly over the existing high water mark on the bank. Rip rap would then be topped with native material and seeded to match the existing bank above and below the impacted area. Repair of the riverbank is critical to prevent further damage to the FAS and protect the county road. If you would like to request a printed version of the EA contact the Region 5 Office at (406) 247-2940. The public comment period will extend for (30) thirty days. Written comments will be accepted until 5:00 P.M. March 16, 2020.

(Region 5 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Hardy Creek Restoration Fill Source EA

02/07/2020

Utilize fill from one of two potential sources to complete the Hardy Creek Restoration Project. A detailed EA for the overall project was completed and posted on 9/13/2019. The public comment period was open through October 14, 2019. A decision notice was posted October 30, 2019 that addressed public comment and it was determined to proceed with the project.

(Region 4 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Environmental Assessment for Arctic Grayling Introduction to Bender Creek in the Big Hole River Drainage

02/05/2020

The enclosed Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to introduce Arctic grayling to Bender Creek upstream of a fish barrier near the Forest Service Boundary. The fish barrier was constructed in 2017 and the non-native brook trout were removed during the subsequent 3 years in order to expand an existing westslope cutthroat trout population that was isolated in the headwaters of the stream (Olsen 2017). That project has been completed; however, recent Arctic grayling releases in similar streams have proven successful and there is suitable grayling habitat in the lower reaches of Bender Creek upstream of the fish barrier. Therefore, FWP is proposing to introduce Arctic grayling into Bender Creek upstream of the fish barrier on National Forest lands in an effort to expand the current range of the fish and provide for long-term conservation of the species. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks invites you to comment on the attached proposal. The public comment period will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. March 6, 2020.

(Region 3 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Rattlesnake Creek Dam Removal Project—Draft EA

11/13/2019

The City of Missoula acquired the approximately 45-acre lower Rattlesnake Creek Dam property and associated infrastructure and water rights in 2017. FWP, the City, and Trout Unlimited then developed a partnership to evaluate and implement mitigation options for the deteriorating dam structure on lower Rattlesnake Creek, located in Missoula on the lower mainstem, approximately 3.5 miles upstream from the confluence with the Clark Fork River. The partnership evaluated the current condition of the dam and associated facilities and developed a range of conceptual alternatives for managing site infrastructure while incorporating ecological restoration of the stream corridor and affected areas. A Draft EA describes the proposal. The proposed action (Alternative 3) is an active restoration option that would include full dam infrastructure removal, reconstruction of the creek and floodplain to tie in 200-feet downstream of the dam, raising the channel profile to improve floodplain connection, construction of off‐channel habitat features, and revegetation of the constructed streambanks, floodplain and disturbed areas.

(Region 2 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Hardy Creek Restoration

09/13/2019

Purpose of the project: Reconnect Hardy Creek with the Missouri River by reconstructing a stream channel through a gravel pit, redefining the channel downstream of the gravel pit, and removing or modifying several culverts in lower Hardy Creek. Restoration of the channel will allow Hardy Creek to function as a spawning and rearing tributary for trout in the Missouri River. Description of the project: Hardy Creek is a small tributary (approximately 10.2 sq mi drainage area) to the Missouri River, south of Cascade, MT. Hardy Creek is a l't order stream and is designated as perennial on the 1961 USGS quad topo map approximately 0.6 miles upstream of the current Old Highway 9T. From this point downstream, Hardy Creek is designated as intermittent; however, Hardy Creek flowed year-round underneath the current I-15 during 2017, which was a dry year, and typically flows year-round downstream to the gravel pit. Hardy Creek has been impacted significantly by construction of a gravel pit on the channel by the early 1960s and the development of numerous road crossings, including in the Pistoria Tracts sub-division, the interstate on and off ramps, and Old Highway 91, all of which are within 0.5 miles from the confluence with the Missouri River. Currently, Hardy Creek flows into a 4.5-acre gravel pit, approximately 0.2 miles upstream from Missouri River (Figure CH-l). The gravel pit outlet elevation is greater than the inlet, thus the gravel pit must fill before it flows out to the Missouri River. Occasionally (when flow and rainbow trout spawning coincide) rainbows will swim up the channel to spawn and then as the water recedes adults and juveniles get trapped in the pond. Typically, the gravel pit and the channel downstream is completely dry by summer, despite perennial flow under the interstate and to the gravel pit. Downstream of the gravel pit, the Hardy Creek channel goes under a railroad bridge and through a culvert (Figure CH-1), before making its way to the Missouri River. The channel downstream of the gravel pit is poorly defined, due to the encroachment of vegetation into the channel from the dampening of flows from the gravel pit. Upstream of the gravel pit, the culvert at the Old Highway 91 is perched and prevents passage of fish into upper Hardy Creek. The project aims to reconnect Hardy Creek with the Missouri River by reconstructing the stream channel through the gravel pit, redefining the channel downstream of the gravel pit, and removing or modifying several culverts in lower Hardy Creek. Restoration of the channel will allow Hardy Creek to function as a spawning and rearing tributary for trout in the Missouri River, which would provide a significant benefit to the Missouri River fishery. The Missouri River below Holter Dam is consistently one of the most popular fisheries in the state, ranking first in angler use in 2015 with 183,479 angler days.

(Region 4 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Horseshoe Lake and Woods Bay Fishing Access Site Forest Management Project Draft Environmental Assessment

08/15/2019

FWP is proposing to conduct forest management treatments on 2 FASs in the Bigfork area in FWP Region 1. The sites proposed for treatment include Woods Bay FAS and Horseshoe Lake FAS. The treatments would involve the removal of primarily conifer trees (both of merchantable and nonmerchantable value) for the purpose of mitigating hazard trees in developed areas, reducing hazardous fuels in the wildland urban interface (WUI), and increasing resiliency to insects and diseases. Please see Narrative Summary, for a detailed description of the proposed action. If approved by the Fish and Wildlife Commission, the work could begin as early as November 2019.

(Region 1 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

Ray Kuhns Wildlife Management Area Single-Year Agricultural Lease Draft Environmental Assessment

08/15/2019

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) proposes to lease approximately 50 acres of the 1,530-acre Ray Kuhns Wildlife Management Area for a period of one-year to evaluate site suitability for agriculture. If successful, FWP will competitively bid a multi-year lease with the intent of using farming to increase wildlife forage and cover, weed control, and improved soil health.

(Region 1 - Development, Improvements, and Enhancements)

 

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11 public notices are currently available for public comment.