State of Montana Website Montana State Parks Website
Montana's Endangered Species

Black-footed Ferret

Black-Footed Ferret

Twenty-nine years after listing, this two-pound weasel remains the rarest mammal in North America. Introduced diseases and a century of prairie dog control have brought it to the brink of extinction. With the death of the last of nine captive ferrets at Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in 1978, most people feared the species had become extinct. [Learn more]

Least Tern

Least Tern

The interior population of least tern was listed as endangered in 1985. Populations along the East and West coasts are not endangered. The interior population, which once inhabited all the major river systems in the middle of the country, evolved to take advantage of constantly changing rivers. [Learn more]

Pallid Sturgeon

Pallid Sturgeon

The pallid sturgeon is the larger of two sturgeons historically found in the upper Missouri River. The other is the more common shovelnose sturgeon. The pallid sturgeon was not recognized as a species until 1905 and that classification is still being debated. Three genetic studies conducted to assess the relationship of the two species have been inconclusive. [Learn more]

White Sturgeon

White Sturgeon

The Kootenai River white sturgeon was listed as endangered in 1994. This population had been declining for at least forty years and natural reproduction has been insignificant since 1974. Kootenai sturgeon began declining in the 1950s and 1960s as water quality deteriorated due to pollution. [Learn more]

Whooping Crane

Whopping Crane

The world whooping crane population now stands at 319, the highest level of the century. Last summer 47 pairs nested in and around Wood Buffalo National Park in the Northwest Territories and adjacent Alberta. This population of 190 whoopers-the only self-sustaining, wild population-winters at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge on the Texas coast. [Learn more]