Close
Menu
  Home » Education » Teachers » Project Wild

Project Wild

Project WILD is one of the most widely-used conservation and environmental education programs among educators of students in kindergarten through high school. Project WILD instructional materials are intended for use in both classroom and informal settings. The instructional materials are designed to support state and national academic standards appropriate for grades K-12.

In 2006 Project WILD celebrated a milestone achievement of having trained 1,000,000 educators since its introduction in 1983. Utilizing the Project WILD curriculum, these educators have provided environmental education instruction to more than 53 million students enabling them to experience the outdoors and gain a deeper appreciation for wildlife and the need to conserve our natural resources. This success was made possible through the enthusiastic support of Project WILD's extensive and talented network of Sponsors, Coordinators, and Facilitators, who have made Project WILD one of the largest wildlife education programs in the world.

The Montana Department of Fish Wildlife & Parks and the Office of Public Instruction participated in the development and implementation of this award-winning program. Today, educators can receive the guides by attending a WILD training.

Materials available on the Project WILD National Website

Project WILD K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide

The Project WILD K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide focuses on wildlife and habitat. It is organized in topic units and is based on the Project WILD conceptual framework. Learn more

Project WILD Aquatic K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide

The Project WILD Aquatic K-12 Curriculum and Activity Guide emphasizes aquatic wildlife and aquatic ecosystems. It is organized in topic units and is based on the Project WILD conceptual framework. Learn more

WILD About Elk Educator Guide

WILD About Elk provides a summary of the biology and ecology of elk. Topics addressed include physical characteristics and adaptations, habitat and historical range, behavior, life cycles, social structure, migratory patterns, and the present and historical relationships between elk and humans. Learn more