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Big Arm (State Park)

Mature ponderosa pine and juniper trees provide a beautiful setting for the campground. The shoreline is popular with sunbathers and swimmers, while the hiking trail provides excellent vistas of surrounding mountain ranges and high peaks with abundant watchable wildlife opportunities.

RV/tent camping sites and yurts are available from May 1 to September 30.Limited services camping is available through mid-November. The boat ramp is open most of the year depending on weather. Please note: There is one ADA accessible campsites at this park. This park and most campsites are reservable from Memorial Day through Labor Day. Click on "Book Now" for more information.

This park and the southern end of Flathead Lake are located on the Flathead Indian Reservation, so you will need a Confederated Salish & Kootenai Tribe fishing license to enjoy the excellent fishing here.

For more information on Flathead Lake State Parks, read Water, Water Everywhere, a 2003 Montana Outdoors article.

Check out the current weather conditions in Polson.

Waterbodies:

Open

Elkhorn (State Park)

Elkhorn State Park Brochure (PDF) During its heyday in the 1880s, the mining town of Elkhorn swelled to a population of 2,500. The boom ended in 1890 with the drop in silver prices and residents moved to other areas. They left behind two impressive structures, Fraternity Hall and Gillian Hall, which have been preserved as outstanding examples of frontier architecture. Each has been recorded in the Historic American Buildings Survey. Bring your camera to record these two picturesque structures. These are the only two buildings in the town of Elkhorn that are publicly owned. Please respect private property while visiting this site.

Open

Finley Point (State Park)

Make Finley Point your base camp to enjoy the many activities in the area. There's hiking, swimming, boating, paddling, and fishing from the park, along with golf, shopping, dining, entertainment and museums in nearby Polson.

This park and the southern end of Flathead Lake are located on the Flathead Indian Reservation, so you will need a Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribe fishing license to enjoy the excellent fishing here.

For more information on Flathead Lake State Parks, read Water, Water Everywhere, 2003 Montana Outdoors article.

Check out the current weather conditions in Polson.

Download the Flathead Lake brochure.

Waterbodies:

Open

Granite Ghost Town (State Park)

The remnants of this once thriving 1890's silver boomtown bear stark witness to Montana's boom-and-bust mining history. The park preserves the Granite Mine Superintendent's House and ruins of the old miners' Union Hall which have been included in the Historic American Buildings Survey. This remote mining camp calls for a camera. The road from Philipsburg to Granite gains 1,280 feet in elevation. The road is narrow, steep and winding. Be prepared to pull over for oncoming traffic and enjoy the vistas. A vehicle with good clearance is recommended.

Open

Most Difficult Accessibility Most Difficult Accessibility

Lake Mary Ronan (State Park)

Lake Mary Ronan State Park campground includes electricity at individual campsites, paved campground road and spurs, a new and improved group camping area, new vault toilets and additional boat trailer parking. Most campsites are reservable.

Waterbodies:

Open

Lewis & Clark Caverns (State Park)

Montana's first and best-known state park showcases one of the most highly decorated limestone caverns in the Northwest. Naturally air conditioned, these spectacular caves, lined with stalactites, stalagmites, columns, and helictites, date back through time.

The hiking trails, rental cabins, and campground are open year-round; tours of the caverns are available from May 1-September 30. Plan to spend a minimum of 2 hours to hike 2 miles on the through the caverns. The park also provides trails, a brand new visitor center, amphitheater, picnic areas, large campground, showers, RV dump facilities, tipi, and 3 cabins. Please be aware that water is turned off from October 1-April 30, so flush toilets, showers, drinking water, and the RV dump facilities are available only during the summer.

It is always a great time to explore the colorful limestone formations with a knowledgeable and friendly guide. See the geologic development, learn the history of early exploration and gain an insight into the delicate ecology of this world without light. While you are at the park, you might also want to hike or bike the extensive trail system, attend an interpretive program, or purchase a unique item in the gift shop. You can use this park as a base camp while you enjoy several nearby state parks, attractions, and the adjacent Jefferson River.

Waterbodies:

Open

 
 
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